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Voting Information – Deadlines, Candidates, & Ballot Questions

By Elizabeth de Veer, Newburyport.com Correspondent
Elizabeth de Veer is a writer who lives in Georgetown, MA. Her hobbies include organizing her elementary school-age daughter and chasing her labradoodle. Favorite coffee: hot. Favorite Beatles album: Sgt. Pepper. Favorite naughty food: lobster roll and fries. Her first novel is due to be published in winter 2019.
Voting Information, Newburyport

If you’re planning on voting this year, you need some information, starting with whether you’re registered to vote, then who the candidates are and what the ballot questions are about. Your opinion counts more when you vote, and you can’t vote unless you register! The deadline to register to vote in Massachusetts is Wednesday, October 17. Voting day itself is Tuesday, November 6.

The Elections Division of the office of the Secretary of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, Bill Galvin, has a wealth of online resources about voting in Massachusetts. But what information do you need for voting? Read on!

Am I registered to vote?

If you’re not sure whether or not you’re registered to vote, you can check your status with a quick search here by providing your name, birthdate and zip code.

If not, how do I register?

If you are a citizen of the United States of America, are over 16, and have an ID issued by the Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles, you can register online. Use the Online Voter Registration System to do any of the following tasks: register or pre-register to voteupdate your address or political party, or update your name. To register, you only need to provide your drivers’ license number, no need to upload any documents. If the information is correct, you will receive a confirmation email within a day or two and then you’ll be good to go. If you’d rather register by mail or in person, you can find instructions here. But make sure you do it by October 17!

Where do I go to vote?

Your street address determines where you are allowed to vote on election day, Tuesday, November 6. To figure out where you need to go, check out the Find My Election Info web page, enter in your address and find out the address of your personal poling station.

Am I allowed to vote early?

As long as you are registered for the general election, you can vote as early as October 22 up until November 2. For a list of places and times where you can vote early, go to this Early Voting search form and select your town.

What Congressional District do I live in?

Massachusetts has nine congressional districts.  The Sixth Congressional District includes: the Essex County cities of Amesbury, Beverly, Gloucester, Lynn, Newburyport, Peabody, and Salem and the towns of Andover, Boxford, Danvers, Essex, Georgetown, Groveland, Hamilton, Ipswich, Lynnfield, Manchester, Marblehead, Merrimac, Middleton, Nahant, Newbury, North Andover, Rockport, Rowley, Salisbury, Saugus, Swampscott, Topsfield, Wenham, and West Newbury.

For the Massachusetts lower state legislative district, Amesbury, Salisbury and Newburyport are in the First Essex District in Massachusetts. For more information, check the Statistical Analysis.

What offices are we voting for this year?

Secretary Galvin’s Elections web site lets you enter in your address and preview your actual ballot.

On Tuesday, November 6, 2018, Massachusetts voters will be asked to vote on the following offices:

U.S. Senator 
ELIZABETH A. WARREN, 24 Linnaean St., Cambridge, Democratic
GEOFF DIEHL, 10 Village Way, Whitman, Republican
SHIVA AYYADURAI, 69 Snake Hill Rd., Belmont, Independent

Governor and Lieutenant Governor 
BAKER and POLITO, Republican
GONZALEZ and PALFREY, Democratic

Attorney General
MAURA HEALEY, 40 Winthrop St., Boston, Democratic
JAMES R. McMAHON, III, 14 Canal View Rd., Bourne, Republican

Secretary of State
WILLIAM FRANCIS GALVIN, 46 Lake St., Boston, Democratic
ANTHONY M. AMORE, 182 Norfolk Ave., Swampscott, Republican
JUAN G. SANCHEZ, JR., 362 High St., Holyoke, Green-Rainbow

Treasurer
DEBORAH B. GOLDBERG, 37 Hyslop Rd., Brookline, Democratic
KEIKO M. ORRALL, 120 Crooked Ln., Lakeville, Republican
JAMIE M. GUERIN, 386 Pleasant St., Northampton, Green-Rainbow

Auditor
SUZANNE M. BUMP, 6 Hoe Shop St., Easton, Democratic
HELEN BRADY, 1630 Monument St., Concord, Republican
DANIEL FISHMAN, 36 Colgate Rd., Beverly, Libertarian
EDWARD J. STAMAS, 42 Laurel Park, Northampton, Green-Rainbow

Representative in U.S. Congress
Sixth District
SETH MOULTON, 10 Forrester St., Salem, Democratic
JOSEPH S. SCHNEIDER, 1203 Broughton Dr., Beverly, Republican
MARY JEAN CHARBONNEAU, 8 Cleaves St., Rockport, Independent

Councillor – Sixth District
TERRENCE W. KENNEDY, 3 Stafford Rd., Lynnfield, Democratic
VINCENT LAWRENCE DIXON, 60 Lake St., Winchester, Unenrolled

MA State Representative 
First Essex District
JAMES M. KELCOURSE, 50 Monroe St., Amesbury, Republican
JENNIFER A. ROCCO-RUNNION, 497 1/2 Main St., Amesbury, Democratic

Second Essex District
LEONARD MIRRA, 11 Mirra Way, West Newbury, Republican
CHRISTINA ECKERT, 14 Anna’s Way, Boxford, Democratic

In addition, Massachusetts voters will be asked to weigh in on three questions:

Question One is about imposing limits on how many patient can be assigned to nurses. A YES VOTE would limit the number of patients that could be assigned to one registered nurse in hospitals and certain other health care facilities. A NO VOTE would make no change in current laws relative to patient-to-nurse limits.

This question is explained in detail in the red voter publication that was sent to everybody in Massachusetts. In-depth description about legislation to limit the patient to nurse ratio.

Question Two proposes a law that would create a citizens’ commission to consider and recommend potential amendments to the United States Constitution to establish that corporations do not have the same Constitutional rights as human beings and that campaign contributions and expenditures may be regulated.

A YES VOTE would create a citizens’ commission to advance an amendment to the United States Constitution to limit the influence of money in elections and establish that corporations do not have the same rights as human beings. A NO VOTE would not create this commission. In-depth description about the citizens’ commission.

Question Three proposes a law to add gender identity to the list of prohibited grounds for discrimination in places of public accommodation, resort, or amusement. Such grounds also include race, color, religious creed, national origin, sex, disability, and ancestry.

A YES VOTE would keep in place the current law, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of gender identity in places of public accommodation. A NO VOTE would repeal this provision of the public accommodation law. In-depth description of the gender identity ballot question.

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